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Eating healthy is super important and the choices we make daily can be the difference of how we feel at the end of the day. If your body isn’t feeling quite right, the first thing to do is to look at your current lifestyle. What are you doing, what are you eating and how much sleep and exercise are you getting? These may not seem like hard questions, but in fact they are. To begin to feel better, we have to be honest with ourselves and take inventory of where we are at before changes and healing can begin.

If you are not one to write things down, you can always use your smart phone or tablet to keep track of what you are eating, when you go to bed and even how much exercise you are getting daily. With so many new apps being developed for our tech world we live in, this process can be easily tackled. If you are like me who hasn’t switched over to the Smart phone you can track your progress on a journal, notebook or whatever works for you. Once you have tracked your daily habits for at least a month, this will help give you a better picture of where you are at. Keeping this information available and providing it to your doctor will be invaluable as you set goals for healthier choices.

We only have one body and what we do will determine the quality of life we have. It won’t be easy to change established habits but taking a look and writing things down is the first step towards change.

A poor diet and poor food choices can have a negative effect on your heart, weight and overall health. By making small daily changes on diet and activity can have a lasting impact on the quality of life that you have.

Dietary Dos and Don’ts
DO focus on fruits and vegetables. Most American’s don’t come close to eating the recommended minimum of five servings per day, but vegetables and fruits of all kinds and colors should take center stage in a healthy diet. They’re rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that promote a healthy heart and body, plus they’re filling and low in calories, which can promote weight management. Fresh, frozen, dried, canned (without sugar/syrups or added salt), raw, cooked—all fruits and vegetables are good for you.

DON’T overdo it on juice and processed “fruit” snacks. The fruit filling in a breakfast pastry is mostly sugar—not a real serving of fruit. And while small amounts of 100% fruit juice can fit into a healthy diet, they’re also concentrated sources of sugar (naturally occurring) and calories compared to whole fruits, which also boast heart-healthy fiber while juice does not.

DO monitor your sodium intake. Sodium gets a bad rap—and deservedly so. Our bodies do need this mineral, but in much smaller quantities than we normally eat. To prevent high blood pressure and heart disease, a healthy sodium goal to strive for is no more than 1,500 milligrams per day. Keep in mind that sodium doesn’t just come from the salt shaker; processed foods, frozen entrees, canned vegetables, common condiments (like ketchup), deli meats (such as salami) and cheeses (including cottage cheese) can be high in sodium, as can many restaurant dishes.

DON’T forget about added sugar. Most people know that sugar isn’t exactly a health food. It provides quick-digesting carbohydrates, but no real nutrition (think: vitamins and minerals). While many people associate sugar with the development of diabetes, few people realize that sugar plays just as much of a role in heart disease as dietary fat does. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that individuals who ate more sugar had lower levels of HDL “good” cholesterol and higher triglycerides—markers of increased heart disease risk. The American Heart Association recommends that women consume no more than 6 teaspoons of added sugars (about 100 calories) each day; that number becomes 9 teaspoons for men (150 calories). Just one 12-ounce can of cola has about 130 calories, or eight teaspoons of sugar.

DO cut back on fat. To reduce your risk of heart disease you need to choose the right types of fat, and make sure that you’re not eating too much fat in general. Most adults eat too much fat, regardless of the source, so cutting back on dietary fat is a good first step to a heart healthy diet. That’s why choosing low-fat products, baking or broiling instead of frying, and reducing or omitting the fats that recipes call for (think: oil, shortening, lard) are important first steps to get your fat intake in line. Avoid fats that elevate your cholesterol levels: trans fats (hydrogenated oils found in baked goods and many margarines) and saturated fats (usually found in high-fat meats and dairy products, including beef, lamb, pork, poultry, beef fat, cream, lard, butter, cheese and dairy products made with whole or 2% milk, as well as baked goods and fried foods that contain palm oil, palm kernel oil and coconut oil). About 25-35% of your total calories for the day should come from fat sources. For someone eating 1,500 calories per day, that’s about 41-58 grams of fat.

DON’T fear all fats. Not all fats are bad for you. In fact, certain types of fat, such as monounsaturated fat and Omega-3s, actually promote heart health. Once you’ve gotten your fat intake in line, focus on making smart fat choices to meet your daily recommendations. Fats found in nuts, olive, soybean and canola oils, fish and seafood.

DO imbibe in moderation (if you drink). Research indicates that a moderate alcohol intake has been associated with a decreased risk for certain cardiovascular diseases, particularly coronary heart disease. A moderate alcohol intake is defined as up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men.

DON’T start drinking alcohol if you aren’t already a drinker. If you don’t drink now, don’t start. Other healthy habits (like not smoking, eating right, getting regular exercise and maintaining a healthy weight) can also help you reduce your risk of heart disease.

DO fill up on fiber. Certain types of fiber may help lower LDL “bad” cholesterol. Adults should aim for 20-30 grams each day. To meet your daily quota, select a variety of unprocessed plant-based foods each day, including whole grains, (oats, whole-wheat bread/flour/cereal fruits and vegetables and beans).

DON’T forget about cholesterol. Cholesterol is a waxy fat-like substance made in the liver and cells of animals. It is therefore found in animal products (meat, poultry, dairy and eggs), but not plant-sourced foods. A high intake of dietary cholesterol can contribute to heart disease. For the prevention of heart disease, limit your intake of dietary cholesterol to less than 300 milligrams each day. If you already have an elevated LDL cholesterol level or you are taking a cholesterol medication, this goal is even lower: 200 milligrams daily.

Sources
Article “Eating for a Healthy Heart”
By: Becky Hand, M.Ed., RD, LD with Nicole Nichols, Health Educator
American Heart Association. “Nutrition Center: Healthy Diet Goals,” accessed March 2011. www.heart.org.
American Heart Association. “Saturated Fats,” accessed March 2011. www.heart.org.
HelpGuide.org “Easy Tips for Planning a Healthy Diet and Sticking To It,” accessed March 2011. www.helpguide.org.
Mayo Clinic. “Healthy Diet: End the Guesswork with These Nutrition Guidelines,” accessed March 2011. www.mayoclinic.com.
United Press International. “Eating Fiber May Reduce Heart Risk,” accessed March 2011. www.upi.com.
Welsh, Jean A, Andrea Sharma, Jerome L. Abramson, Viola Vaccarino, Cathleen Gillespie and Miriam B. Vos. “Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults,” Journal of the American Medical Association.